2020-06-18

Let’s talk about soft skills: Organization and time management

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Soft Skills Certificate Organization & Time Management Soft Skills Certificate Organization & Time Management Milena Sapey

Organization and time management are soft skills related to the ability to plan your tasks to achieve them on time. It involves being aware of the available resources (time, human, material), being a team worker as well a being responsible.

That's why we believe it's important to set goals when volunteering. You need to be aware of the time you are staying, how much you want to achieve, and then settle smaller tasks to achieve the main goal. Of course, this is something that we can do as a team, you don't have to do it on your own. We can work on this skill together.

We understand volunteering as an experience that works in two ways, which is always about an exchange with others. For this reason, volunteering has to work for the project, but it also has to work for volunteers. Therefore, volunteers can decide how many days a week they want to go to the project (from 3 to 5), that's why it's important to be organized and responsible. We understand volunteers are also tourists, responsible tourists, so the experience also involves getting immersed in a new culture, travel around, and get to know the city.

We consider volunteers as part of our community: you have a voice, we encourage you to take action, to have initiative. So when you commit to a project, you need to be organized, clear, and responsible. You need to take your time to analyze what you want to do, but also if that is a realistic goal. Resources are sometimes scarce and we need to be creative on how to design tasks. That's how volunteering can help you to develop organization and time management.

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