2020-10-27

COVID and Primary Health Care Centers

Written by
Rate this item
(0 votes)

How have primary health center relationships with the community changed? 

These are times when health personnel is exhausted, the population is exhausted too, and there are great challenges in adapting to the protocols. This happens in a particular way in health institutions that work with prevention and health promotion since there are certain activities of contact with the community that cannot be carried out.

In this scenario, the relationship between health centers and neighborhoods is compromised. In addition, there is another factor that occurs in times of COVID since many patients stopped getting the necessary check-ups during the stricter quarantine and many still do not attend health centers for fear of contagion. We spoke with Fernando, the director of the health center we work within the network, so he could tell us a little bit about how they are doing:

"We are working a lot on this new reality that is complicated, doing a lot of follow-up of COVID cases but also, after so much isolation, people start coming for other diseases to get checked. We are also with reduced staff because many are at risk and can not work so we are adapting to this new reality"

Read 10341 times

Related items

Argentina: A Dream Fulfilled

Argentina. A land of many ecosystems and one of the largest countries in South America. As a young adult, I dreamt of visiting Argentina, especially after reading Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara’s, “The Motorcycle Diaries,” and seeing the movie thereafter. Although the story and book focused on Che Guevara’s life, images of the Argentine landscape could not escape my mind. So, I decided to learn more about Argentina’s ecosystems and communities in various parts of the country via my studies.

BA GUIDE: How to feel more at home in the city

Getting to a new city can often be overwhelming, especially one as big as Buenos Aires! There were lots of things I did when I first got to the city to settle in, and some things that my friends did that I didn’t. From my own experience, and having spoken to them, I’ve compiled a guide of how to feel comfortable in the wonderful cosmopolitan metropolis that is the city of Buenos Aires.

How to Help When Things Seem a Bit Hopeless

In a time full of uncertainty, it can be hard not to feel despair as the news cycle makes the state of the world seem ever more desperate and beyond repair. This can be made worse by social media, which exposes us to (often unverified news) on a constant loop, making it very difficult to feel anything but anxious and powerless. Unfortunately these feelings, understandable as they are, stop us from taking action. The more dread we feel, the more paralysed we become and the less likely we are to mobilise. And whilst any one individual is unlikely to effect great change, there’s a whole lot that we can do together! That’s why volunteering can be a great way to get involved with a community, and break this cycle of feeling powerless. But sometimes it can be hard to know where to start, so I’ll share a few tips with you that have helped me:

A long weekend in Patagonia

Bariloche was not somewhere I’d heard of before coming to Argentina. Rather, I discovered it through recommendations from locals and the Instagram stories of exchange students. In most aspects of my life, I tend to plan and research diligently before doing something, but on this trip I took a step back and barely glanced at the guidebook or google images before going.

Los Pibes: La Boca beyond Instagram and Gangster films

‘Los pibes’ in Rioplatense Spanish means the kids, and that, unsurprisingly, is what this movement is dedicated to. To the children of now, but also those of the future, a future that will hopefully look different for those in the famous and infamous neighbourhood of La Boca. Whilst the ‘El caminito’ area is a hotspot for tourists who come to admire the brightly painted buildings and the street performers, according to several guidebooks and foreign travel advice pages, leaving this part of town leaves a traveller vulnerable to violent muggings.

Cultural Differences: Argentina & UK - Part II

This is part two of the cultural differences between the UK (where I’m from) and Argentina (where I’m living at the moment). Check out part one, also on this page!

What's it like to come to Buenos Aires as a volunteer?

When I first considered my exchange year abroad, and which Spanish-speaking country I wanted to be in, I thought initially of a continent, and then of a specific country. I’d studied some Latin American, and specifically Argentinian literature last year and I’d heard really good things about the country, so, after a bit more research, I knew Argentina would be the place for me.

Cultural differences: Argentina & UK - Part I

All of my comparisons here are generalisations, taken from my own experiences in the UK (extensive) and in Argentina (much less so) I’ve now been in Argentina for just over a month, volunteering as a communications assistant and I thought now was a great time to take a step back and note down some of the differences I’ve noticed in my short time here. The differences I’ve briefly outlined are completely based on my own experiences. Give this a read and see if the ones I’ve noticed match up with your own perceptions!
Login to post comments