2021-06-03

Online volunteering: Anya's experience

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Anya tells us about her experience teaching English online. She volunteered for 2 months teaching in two English institutes and organizing special workshops every Friday.

How do you feel about online volunteering?
 
I think volunteering online is a great experience since the opportunity allows people to connect with one another from across the globe. Volunteering online permits people to learn about one another culturally without leaving their homes, and it also helps to break social barriers and misconceptions through direct communication online.
 
What did you learn from this experience?
 
I learned that people in Argentina are warm and very expressive. Everyone genuinely cares about one another and is open to helping newcomers like myself. I also learned that Voluntario Global is a wonderful organization that seeks to help community members grow in many ways and prepare younger generations for real world experience which is very important.
 
Would you recommend online volunteering? Why?
 
I would definitely recommend online volunteering because of the ability to learn from someone else in another part of the world while in the comfort of home. Additionally, students can share their surroundings to see how another person in a different culture might live helping to dispel misconceptions that people formulate because they have not had the opportunity to experience a new location or culture.
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